Hypnosis and Its Various Uses

hypnotic stareHypnosis can effect so many aspects of our lives.  From ending phobias to ending smoking habits.  Different people are stimulated differently from the dealings with hypnosis.  Just take a look at how Keira Knightley utilized hypnosis early on in her career as noted by Self.com:

The procedure involves having a trained clinician (such as a licensed therapist) make suggestions to elicit changes in the client’s thoughts, perceptions, sensations, and behaviors (changing their smoking habits, for instance), per the APA. Although research on its efficacy in regards to various conditions is spotty, hypnosis has been used (in conjunction with other treatments) to help manage pain, nausea and vomiting, stress, phobias, depression, and anxiety, as the APA notes.

People respond to hypnosis to varying degrees and different ways, but most people for whom the procedure works experience a sense of calm and relaxation. The APA reminds people that hypnosis may not be for everyone, and that the decision to use the procedure as an adjunct treatment should always be made with the help of an accredited health care professional who understands both its potential uses and limitations.

On another note, hypnosis has also been accused for being misused as stated in the following article according to The Observer:

“I’ve never seen so many repressed memory cases in my life, especially against one guy,” Fox News anchor Jeanine Pirro said of Kavanaugh’s accusers on-air last week. “My question is, if there’s something awry going on, was there hypnosis, are they using confabulation?”

This explanation was given new life on Tuesday after Margot Cleveland—a freelance writer for The Federalist, National Review, Townhall and Washington Examiner—unearthed a research paper Ford coauthored alongside 11 other researchers titled “Meditation with Yoga, Group Therapy with Hypnosis, a Psychoeducation for Long-Term Depressed Mood: A Randomized Pilot Trial.” Cleveland pointed to the fact that participants in the trial “were taught self hypnosis” to “create artificial situations” as evidence that Ford may have constructed fake memories.